Iran calls Bibi speech ‘show of deception’

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) addresses a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., the United States, March 3, 2015. Netanyahu on Tuesday called for rejection of a bad nuclear deal with Iran, insisting such an accord would allow the Islamic republic to develop nuclear bombs.
Advertisement

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) addresses a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., the United States, March 3, 2015. Netanyahu on Tuesday called for rejection of a bad nuclear deal with Iran, insisting such an accord would allow the Islamic republic to develop nuclear bombs.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) addresses a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., the United States, March 3, 2015. Netanyahu on Tuesday called for rejection of a bad nuclear deal with Iran, insisting such an accord would allow the Islamic republic to develop nuclear bombs.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech in US Congress  on a potential agreement on Iran’s nuclear issue was a “show full of deception,” Iran’s foreign ministry said.

Netanyahu’s speech was the sign of “weakness and isolation” of the radicals in Israel and their attempts to influence the international policies, ministry spokesperson Marzieh Afkham was quoted as saying by Iran’s Student News Agency (ISNA).

“There is no doubt that global public opinion no longer respects the (Israeli) regime which has killed the children,” she said alluding to the Israeli attack on Gaza Strip last year, according to Xinhua.

The repetitive lies of Netanyahu’ about Iran’s nuclear programme is “boring”, she said, adding that “Iran’s strong will to solve this fabricated crisis” of the country’s nuclear issue and its active participation in the nuclear talks with the world major powers have shattered the foundations of Iranophebia in the world.

On Tuesday, the Israeli prime minister told a joint session of US Congress that “we are better off” without a bad deal with Iran.

He claimed that a potential final negotiated deal will make “major concessions” to Iran by leaving it with “a vast nuclear infrastructure” and providing it with “a short break-out time to the bomb,” as well as by lifting all the restrictions on its nuclear programme in about a decade.

 

[mc4wp_form id=""]