A daughter is fulfilling her father’s dream

Manchester-Medical-School-senior-faculty-head-of-MMS-Deans
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Dr Madhavi Paladugu’s passion for medical education transcends borders….writes Rajitha Saleem

A daughter is fulfilling her father’s dream and more by becoming the first Telugu person to be an Undergraduate Dean in the Lancashire Teaching Hospital, affiliated to Manchester Medical School—Dr Madhavi Paladugu has dedicated her life to improve education and medical education in particular.

Recognising her contribution to education, she is been awarded professorship from Manchester university and she became the first Telugu doctor to be awarded such an honorary chair.

“My father who was a self-made man is my inspiration. He dreamt about making a change through education, and I am living his dream. My mother is my mentor,” says a visibly proud Dr Madhavi. Dr Madhavi is the first doctor in the family who had passed out from the Kakatiya Medical College in Vijayawada in Andhra Pradesh by winning gold medals in all subjects, and has been a topper all through her education.

Manchester-Medical-School-senior-faculty-head-of-MMS-Deans
Manchester-Medical-School-senior-faculty-head-of-MMS-Deans

A consultant Paediatrician with an interest in neo natal and infectious diseases, Dr Madhavi’s passion was always medical education. An MSc in medical education, Dr Madhavi said:  “The innovative methods used in medical education which includes light simulation helps the students to learn in a more practical way. This interactive methods helps the trainees to gain confidence in emergency conditions, in team building and management of complex patients. Similarly, e learning packages which complement simulation sessions provides flexibility in training when they are working in shift systems. The surgical skills suite allows the students to observe the surgery in real time being done, eeven from outside the theatre, allows the students to ask questions and these teachings sessions are kept confidential and done always with the patient’s consent.”

The students can observe the surgery being done, even when they are outside the theatre, and these teachings are kept confidential and always with the patient’s consent.”

Dr Madhavi informs that these new methods of `blended learning’ are certainly more effective in that it simulates the hospital environment. Recently honoured by Telugu Association of Scotland (TAS) on the International Women’s Day, Dr Madhavi has been very active in the area of social and charity work, where she visits her hometown of Vijayawada every year to teach UG and PG medical students and engaged her children in regular social activities .

Providing-life-long-supply-of-factor-8-to-a-young-boy-wth-hemophilia_PPR-accademy2
Providing-life-long-supply-of-factor-8-to-a-young-boy-wth-hemophilia_PPR-accademy2

India is one of the examination centres for the Member of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (MRCPCH) exam which was introduced in 2011. Earlier the aspirants for the MRCPCH exams had to come to England to write the same. Dr Madhavi, being a senior member of RCPCH exam board and vice chair for foundation of practice part of MRCPCH exam, established a MRCPCH clinical training course in Vijayawada Which is endorsed by RCPCH UK.

The Capstone clinical course established by Dr Madhavi for the aspirants of the MRCPCH has senior trainers from RCPCH exam board give training to candidates from countries such as Nepal, Burma, Oman, Middle East and Australia in addition to India. The money raised by the course and funds will aid her charity PPR Academy, which was established in memory of her father Purnachandra Rao. One of the significant achievements of PPR academy is to provide lifelong supply of factor 8 to a young boy with haemophilia.

“I would also like to contribute to improve medical education in India where we overlook the importance of communication both at the undergraduate and post graduate levels. We do have doctors with excellent knowledge but with the right training to enhance their communication we can improve the patient satisfaction and safety. I would really like to see this crucial change happening in the Indian medical curriculum,” says Dr Madhavi. She intends to explore the possibilities of an Indo-UK collaboration to engage the medical universities in India with the Manchester Medical School towards this.

TAS-honours-Dr-Madhavi-on-International-Womens-Day
TAS-honours-Dr-Madhavi-on-International-Womens-Day

Dr Madhavi has instilled the qualities of charity in her children too. Her son Abhishikth Chennupati who is in his second year at Medical School, had gone to Kenya and had volunteered to do health and first aid to the needy. Abhishikth has taught first aid to children in an orphanage who are deaf and dumb in India. Her daughter Prathyuksha Chennupati completed medicine and in specialty training has raised funds and organised MMR camp to children in an orphanage in Inida. She helps her mother in her charity work. Dr Madhavi lives in Manchester with her husband Dr Nagesh Chennupati.