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Asia move to protect its tigers

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Nepal in talks with Corbett park for anti-poaching system….reports Asian Lite News

 A Nepalese girl smiles with her face painted as a tiger during a program marking International Tiger day in Kathmandu, Nepal, July 29, 2015. International Tiger day is celebrated annually on July 29, aiming to raise awareness for tiger conservation. The population of endangered Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera Tigris Tigris) in Nepal is estimated to 163-235 breeding adults, comprising the numbers in various National Parks and Wildlife Reserves.
A Nepalese girl smiles with her face painted as a tiger during a program marking International Tiger day in Kathmandu, Nepal, July 29, 2015. International Tiger day is celebrated annually on July 29, aiming to raise awareness for tiger conservation. The population of endangered Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera Tigris Tigris) in Nepal is estimated to 163-235 breeding adults, comprising the numbers in various National Parks and Wildlife Reserves.

Asian is taking action to protect its tigers. Nepali officials are holding talks with the famed Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) in Uttarakhand, India, to adopt its ‘electronic I’ (EI) surveillance system as an anti-poaching measure, its director said.

“Nepal officials have been talking to us for the last one year. In the EI technology, cameras are connected by wireless through a series of nine towers. Sitting here, I can monitor my area. It’s like a live telecast,” CTR director Samir Sinha told IANS here.

“Any human intervention or activity triggers an alarm which officials have to respond to,” he said.

The cameras are essentially thermal cameras and the nine cameras cover an area of 200 sq km.

“West Bengal has also talked about using that system. We are looking at a new anti-poaching strategy and for streamlining tourism. The essence of anti-poaching strategy will be a mixture of technology and human intervention,” Sinha added.

He said the technology has been a success given that in the last two-and-a-half years since its introduction, there have been no mishaps.

He was talking on the sidelines of a panel discussion organised by the Society for Heritage and Ecological Researches (SHER) and Association for Conservation and Tourism at the Indian Museum here on the occasion of ‘Global Tiger Day’.

Quizzed on the challenges faced by tiger reserves in conservation, Sinha said poaching is a “constant threat”.

“By and large, the challenges are similar to any tiger-bearing area. There is a constant threat in terms of poaching… so you have to be on the alert all the time,” Sinha said.

He also voiced concern about the promises of eco-tourism.

“There are a lot of promises but the deliverables are not happening in most places. Tiger-centric tourism is creating a problem. The money doesn’t percolate to the local people,” he said.

The tiger is the largest of the world’s big cats and this magnificent creature, with its distinctive orange and black stripes and beautifully marked face, has a day that is dedicated to it. This was first celebrated in 2010 and was founded at an international summit that had been called in response to the shocking news that 97% of all wild tigers had disappeared in the last century, with only around 3,000 left alive. Tigers are on the brink of extinction and International World Tiger Day aims to bring attention to this fact and try to halt their decline. Many factors have caused their numbers to fall, including habitat loss, climate change, hunting and poaching and Tiger Day aims to protect and expand their habitats and raise awareness of the need for conservation. Many international organisations are involved in the day, including the WWF, the IFAW and the Smithsonian Institute.

 

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