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Search for MH370 Resumes

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Photo shows Joao de Abreu, director of the National Civil Aviation Institute of Mozambique, displaying a piece of an airplane during a news conference in Maputo, capital of Mozambique. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau on April 20, 2016 released a technical examination report, definitively saying the debris found in Mozambique was part of the lost Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. (Xinhua/IANS)

Search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 resumes; a ship left South Africa, bound for a search area off the coast of Perth; the Australia-led search for the aircraft was suspended in January 2017….reports Asian Lite News

Photo shows Joao de Abreu, director of the National Civil Aviation Institute of Mozambique, displaying a piece of an airplane during a news conference in Maputo, capital of Mozambique. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau on April 20, 2016 released a technical examination report, definitively saying the debris found in Mozambique was part of the lost Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. (Xinhua/IANS)

The search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has resumed after a research ship left South Africa, bound for a search area off the coast of Perth, authorities announced on Wednesday.

The Malaysian government has enlisted the US seabed exploration company Ocean Infinity, which chartered Norwegian ship Seabed Constructor, due to arrive in Perth on February 7 after it set sail from Port Durban on Tuesday.

The Malaysia Airlines flight disappeared on March 8, 2014, en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, with 239 people on board, sparking the largest search in aviation history.

The aircraft was bound for Beijing, but changed course suddenly over the South China Sea and broke off radio contact. It was last detected by radar near the northern tip of Sumatra, heading west-north-west into the open ocean.

Subsequent connections to a communications satellite suggested that it crashed somewhere along an arc 1,500km west of Australia.

Its disappearance is one of the world’s greatest aviation mysteries and sparked the largest-ever search, costing about $200 million.

The Australia-led search for the aircraft was suspended in January 2017, much to the anguish of distraught relatives.

At the time it was suspended, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau released findings from international and CSIRO scientists that identified a smaller 25,000 sq.km area with “a high probability” that it contained the aircraft.

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