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BGM Braces For India-UK Year Of Culture

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Daksha Sheth Dance Company presents the UK Premiere of SARI

Continuing the season of celebration of India and UK’s historic alliance in the India-UK Year of Culture this year, the High Commission of India in UK, along with key partners in the UK and Indian festival producer Teamwork Arts, brings three of India’s most celebrated dance and theatre companies to Birmingham….reports Asian Lite News

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Daksha Sheth Dance Company presents the UK Premiere of SARI

The troupes, Daksha Sheth Dance CompanyDramanon and Aditi Mangaldas Dance Company, are set to show their award-winning productions in some of Birmingham’s top arts venues this autumn as part of India @ UK 2017, an elaborate showcase of classic and contemporary Indian culture. A Festival of Dance and Theatre traveling across multiple venues in the UK with a rich and diverse programming calendar.

“Astonishing artistry, suppleness and energy make Sari a timeless tableau with a soul.” The Hindu

“The dancers of the Daksha Sheth Company are phenomenal!” The Guardian

Sari, a show conceived to rekindle the lost playfulness and individuality of the graceful and inimitable “sari”, expresses the weavers’ imagination, the wearer’s sensuality and her regional identity. The sari is truly the jewel of the Indian handloom industry, an industry which with its incredible range of colour, texture and design has, for millennia, been one the most visually striking elements of Indian culture.

Through the expertise of renowned dancer and choreographer Daksha Sheth, Sari is a celebration of this unique drape, in constant play with the body, both in stillness and in movement.

Bringing together acrobatics, dance and poetry in her trademark style, Daksha’s knowledge of Kathak, Mayurbhanj Chhau, the martial art of Kalaripayattu and the aerial technique of Mallakhamb fuse with Indian contemporary dance to create a stunning and memorable performance.

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Dramanon presents Akshayambara

Sari, an idea of Rta Kapur Chisti, co-author and editor of Saris – Tradition and Beyond, has been directed by composer Devissaro and choreographed by Daksha Sheth.

“Astonishing artistry, suppleness and energy make Sari a timeless tableau with a soul.” The Hindu

“The dancers of the Daksha Sheth Company are phenomenal!” The Guardian

Sari, a show conceived to rekindle the lost playfulness and individuality of the graceful and inimitable “sari”, expresses the weavers’ imagination, the wearer’s sensuality and her regional identity. The sari is truly the jewel of the Indian handloom industry, an industry which with its incredible range of colour, texture and design has, for millennia, been one the most visually striking elements of Indian culture.

Through the expertise of renowned dancer and choreographer Daksha Sheth, Sari is a celebration of this unique drape, in constant play with the body, both in stillness and in movement.

Bringing together acrobatics, dance and poetry in her trademark style, Daksha’s knowledge of Kathak, Mayurbhanj Chhau, the martial art of Kalaripayattu and the aerial technique of Mallakhamb fuse with Indian contemporary dance to create a stunning and memorable performance.

 Sari, an idea of Rta Kapur Chisti, co-author and editor of Saris – Tradition and Beyond, has been directed by composer Devissaro and choreographed by Daksha Sheth.

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Aditi Mangaldas Dance Company presents Interrupted

“With a clever use of dramatic monologue and set design, Sharanya blurred the lines between the stage and life.” The Hindu

Akshayambara, the experimental Kannada language play written and directed by Sharanya Ramprakash, is a ground-breaking production by the renowned Indian company Dramanon, premiering in the UK this autumn.

Using both modern theatrical tools and the dance drama form of Yakshagana a contemporary narrative is created, one that raises questions on female representation and male ownership. It explores the representation of the feminine within the male-dominated practice of Yakshagana, while asking what happens when a woman enters the professional space of a form performed by men for the last 800 years.

Drawing from research and personal experience, the performance imagines a reversal of roles in the popular Yakshagana plot of ‘Draupadi Vastrapaharana’. A male artist in streevesha plays the virtuous Draupadi and espouses the cause of a woman, while in a tradition defying move, a woman is cast as the Pradhana Purusha vesha of a Kaurava who is driven by lust and power.

What happens to the interpretation of gender when a man plays the streevesha and the purusha vesha is played by a woman? We see a constant shift of power between the actors as they shift from cauki (greenroom) to stage, engaged in a tussle that blurs the boundaries of stage and reality, male and female, thereby exploring the conflicts around tradition, gender, power and morality.

The play was developed through the INLAKS Scholarship ’14, supported by the India Foundation for the Arts (IFA) and premiered at the Ranga Shankara Theatre Festival ’15. It was recently nominated in eight categories at the Mahindra Excellence in Theatre Awards (META) ’16 where it won Best Original Script & Best Actor (Male).