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This year four British artists took themselves off as a group to Varanasi in India to capture the light, heat, people, buildings and landscapes and something of the way in which India seduces the visitor…reports Asian Lite News

panchganga ghat
panchganga ghat

The result is a stunning contemporary look at this most fascinating of Indian cities which is on view as an exhibition in London this October alongside a TV documentary that has also been made of their trip. The results of the trip will be on show from Oct 14th to Nov 7th at the Indar Pasricha Gallery at 22 Connaught St, London. The collection of glowing works range in price from £700 to £20,000.

The stunningly vibrant works of Ken Howard, Patrick Cullen, Peter Brown and Neale Worley, were mostly done while painting en plein air. The result proves afresh that India captivates. Travelling together with their paints and easels the four artist friends worked in Varanasi exclusively. Neale Worley was the author of the TV documentary made on location in Varanasi while the other three were painting, which will be premiered at the exhibition.

The four artists chose Varanasi as their subject as it is among the world’s oldest continually inhabited

young india
young india

cities.

Gallery owner, Indar Pasricha, says of this exhibition: “These four modern artistic Musketeers have been going to India as a group for years, bringing back images of the people, the ghats, the grand landscapes, the cities, and this year they have captured Varanasi in paint.”

Indar says, “You have Patrick Cullen’s colour, capturing the extraordinary kaleidoscopic palette of India; Ken Howard’s use of light and reflection; Peter Brown’s tangible sense of place, the dust, the mayhem – you can almost smell the street; and Neale Worley’s portraits which capture the grace and poise that is such a striking feature of so many Indians.”

This contemporary British tribute to India is led by a fantastic image of burning ghats on the Ganges river at dusk by Patrick Cullen which won a prize at this year’s Lynn Painter Stainers competition.

There is something anachronistic in the idea of four artists taking off for India together to paint in company, but the idea of a school of artists is as old as time. The men agree that the work of the others influences and inspires their own distinctive imagery. And in the evening, after a day spent painting they retire to their hostelry for dinner and a discussion of the day’s work, its trials and tribulations and triumphs.

 

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