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Cameron promises a ‘different government’

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Great to meet mums and children at Stepping Stones nursery - telling them about our plan for 30 hours free childcare.

Great to meet mums and children at Stepping Stones nursery - telling them about our plan for 30 hours free childcare.
Great to meet mums and children at Stepping Stones nursery – telling them about our plan for 30 hours free childcare.

British Prime Minister David Cameron promised to lead a “different government” at his first all-Conservative cabinet meeting following his triumph in the general election last week.

Pledging to deliver his party’s pre-election manifesto in full,quoted Cameron telling his new cabinet: “This will be a different government. It is not a coalition government so we have proper accountability, no trading away of things that are in here (the manifesto).”

He said the ability to deliver the pledges “is one of the most important things we can do to restore trust and faith that in politics you vote for something, you get it.”

“It is absolutely vital that every decision that we take, every policy we pursue, every programme start is about giving everyone in our country the best chance of living a fulfilling and good life and making the most of their talents,” he noted.

Labeling the Conservatives as a party for the working people, the prime minister went on: “Some pundits might call it ‘ blue-collar Conservatism’, or being on the side of hard-working taxpayers. I would call it being the real party of working people. ”

“The dignity of work, the dignity of having a pay check, being able to keep more of their own money to spend as they choose, a home of their own … being able to raise a family and have a decent and secure retirement. Those are the down-to-earth, bread-and-butter issues that we were elected to deliver on,” he elaborated.

The Conservative Party won 331 out of a total of 650 seats in the general election held on Thursday, securing the first Conservative majority in the parliament since 1997.

Cameron’s first all-Conservative cabinet saw most of his close allies retain their jobs, including Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, Home Secretary Theresa May, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and Defence Secretary Michael Fallon.