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Majority Sceptic Over Migration Targets

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People take part in a march against the outcome of the recent EU referendum, in London, Britain, July 2, 2016. Around 40,000 people attended the anti-Brexit march after a petition with 4 million signatures was submitted to the parliament, calling for a second referendum.

Majority Britons Sceptic over Brexit targets on net migration….reports Asian Lite News

People take part in a march against the outcome of the recent EU referendum, in London, Britain, July 2, 2016. Around 40,000 people attended the anti-Brexit march after a petition with 4 million signatures was submitted to the parliament, calling for a second referendum.
People take part in a march against the outcome of the recent EU referendum, in London, Britain, July 2, 2016. Around 40,000 people attended the anti-Brexit march after a petition with 4 million signatures was submitted to the parliament, calling for a second referendum.

Only about a third of the public think the government will meet its net migration target in the next 5 years, even after Brexit, according to polling for a new British Future report, What next after Brexit? Immigration and integration in post-referendum Britain.

Along with other polls,the study shows immigration ranking alongside the economy and the NHS as the issues that they care most about, it’s an indicator of just how low public trust has fallen in governments’ competence to manage immigration.

Only 12% of people would like to see a reduction in the numbers of highly skilled workers migrating to Britain; nearly four times as many (46%) would like to see more of it, with 42% saying that it should stay the same. Among people who voted Leave in the referendum these numbers remain broadly the same: 45% would like to see an increase, 40% say that the numbers should stay as they are and just 15% would like to see them reduced.
Only a fifth of people (22%) would like the number of international students coming to study at Britain’s universities to be reduced, less than the 24% who would be happy for them to increase. The majority (54%, including 50% of Leave voters) would rather the numbers stayed the same. Students made up over a quarter of immigration flows to the UK last year .

Most people (52%) would be happy for the number of people joining immediate family in the UK to remain the same. 13% think it should be increased while 35% would prefer it reduced.

People are less positive about low-skilled workers moving to the UK, however: while four in ten (38%) would be happy for numbers to stay the same (31%) or increase (7%), six in ten (62%) would prefer the numbers to be reduced.
Consulting the public should form part of a comprehensive immigration review that takes a 360-degree look at all aspects of immigration policy – different types of immigration, policy options and their impacts, the staffing needs of business and public services and the pressures that rapid population change can place on local communities. More effective measures are needed to ease some of those pressures – on housing, school places and health services – through a migration impacts fund that is well-resourced and is seen to make a difference to frontline services in the areas that need some help.