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Merkel says ‘no need to be nasty’

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Prime Minister David Cameron arrives at the City Hall, Hamburg, where he is greeted by Chancellor Merkel and First Mayor of Hamburg, Olaf Scholz.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the European Union has “no need to be particularly nasty in any way” in the negotiations with Britain about its exit from the bloc.

Prime Minister David Cameron arrives at the City Hall, Hamburg, where he is greeted by Chancellor Merkel and First Mayor of Hamburg, Olaf Scholz.
Prime Minister David Cameron arrives at the City Hall, Hamburg, where he is greeted by Chancellor Merkel and First Mayor of Hamburg, Olaf Scholz.

Chancellor Merkel insisted that deterring other countries from leaving the EU should not be a priority in the talks, BBC reported. And she added she was not in favour of pushing for a speedy withdrawal.

“It shouldn’t take forever, that’s right, but I would not fight for a short time frame,” she said.

She added that she was seeking an “objective, good” climate in the talks with Britain, which “must be conducted properly”.

Merkel was speaking after several EU foreign ministers – including Germany’s – had urged Britain to quickly implement its exit.

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier had earlier said negotiations should begin as “soon as possible”.

He made the comments after an urgent meeting of the six EU founder members to discuss the decision.
EU Weakened

Britain’s exit from the European Union (EU) will greatly weaken the bloc, European Commission Vice President Maros Sefcovic has said.

“If a country like Britain exits, it must be perceived by the outside world as weakening the Union and as a demonstration of the crisis that the EU is undergoing,” said Sefcovic on Sunday, Xinhua news agency reported.

He also said that the EU has been considered a perfect form of integration and a model tool to maintain peace on a continent that was troubled by a war every few decades.

Sefcovic said the British referendum played into the hands of populists and Eurosceptics.

“There is a need to explain and defend the benefits and decisions of the Union in a more convincing manner, and also at the national level,” stated Sefcovic.

Sefcovic does not believe the outcome of the British referendum can be reversed.

“This would mean the protraction of instability and uncertainty. Maybe we could get to this debate a generation later,” he said, adding that there is currently a need to agree with Britain not only on its exit from the EU, but also on further cooperation with it.