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Pakistan Tops UK’s Aid List

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Prime Minister Theresa May meets Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif at No 10 Downing Street

Defying the speculations, Britain has hit the UN target of spending 0.7% of national income on aid for the third year in succession….reports Asian Lite News

Prime Minister Theresa May meets Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif at No 10 Downing Street
Prime Minister Theresa May meets Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif at No 10 Downing Street

According to figures from the Department for International Development (DFID), Britain has fulfilled its commitment to spend 0.7 per cent of national income on aid. Indian-origin British politician Priti Patel MP is heading the department. The figures shows Pakistan got £374 million British aid ahead of Ethiopia’s £339 million. India, a rising economy power in the world, gets £186 million.

Other recipients are: Afghanistan (£300 million), Nigeria (£263 million), Syria (£258 million). All of the top 20 recipients were in Africa – which took almost £2.8 billion (55%) of the total – or Asia – which received around £2.1 billion (41%). Just 3% of spending went to the Americas, 1% to Europe and 0.2% to the Pacific region.

The statistics released by the DFID showed that the £12.1 billion of overseas development aid in 2015 represented exactly 0.7% of the UK’s gross national income. However, spending on aid fell below the target when measured by new international accounting standards adopted in 2014, which put the level at 0.66%.

The British Government has pledged to meet the new standards – which came into effect after spending plans for last year were set – in its aid spending for this year. Total aid spend in 2015 was up by £437 million (3.7%) compared with 2014.

British aid to developing countries, especially former colonies and troubled economies, was a main issue during the Brexit campaign. Even Priti Patel was in supportive of abolishing the system.

The government even hinted it would stop sending aid to countries like India and China because their rapid economic growth had made it unnecessary, but it said some “technical assistance” would continue.