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Parliament Defeats Prime Minister

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LONDON, May 2, 2018 (Xinhua) -- British Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Boris Johnson heads to 10 Downing Street for a Brexit cabinet meeting in London, Britain, on May 2, 2018. British Prime Minister Theresa May held a Brexit meeting with select cabinet ministers here on Wednesday. (Xinhua/Tim Ireland/IANS) by .

Prime Minister Boris Johnson tastes defeat as parliamentarians voted against his decision to prorogue Parliament and lead the country to a no-deal Brexit.

LONDON, May 2, 2018 (Xinhua) -- British Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Boris Johnson heads to 10 Downing Street for a Brexit cabinet meeting in London, Britain, on May 2, 2018. British Prime Minister Theresa May held a Brexit meeting with select cabinet ministers here on Wednesday. (Xinhua/Tim Ireland/IANS) by .
British Prime Mnister Boris Johnson. (Xinhua/Tim Ireland/IANS)

MPs, including 21 from the Conservative Party, win bid to take control of Commons agenda by 328 to 301 votes.  They will legislate on Wednesday against no-deal Brexit in October, paving way for snap election.

Mr Johnson said he would bring forward a motion for an early general election. But Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the bill should be passed before an election was held.

He told MPs he had no choice but to press ahead with efforts to call an October election, adding: “The people of this country will have to choose.”

 

In total 21 Tory MPs, including a number of ex-cabinet ministers and Winston Churchill’s grandson, joined opposition parties to defeat the government. Their whips were removed after the defeat. The Blue MPs rebelled against Boris are:  Guto Bebb, Richard Benyon,  Steve Brine, Alistair Burt, Greg Clarke, Ken Clarke, David Gauke, Justine Greening, Dominic Grieve, Sam Gymiah, Philip Hammond, Stephen Hammond and Richard Harrington.

The prime minister said the MPs’ bill would “hand control” of Brexit negotiations to the EU and bring “more dither, more delay, more confusion”.

The result means the MPs will be able to take control of Commons business on Wednesday. That will give them the chance to introduce a cross-party bill which would force the prime minister to ask for Brexit to be delayed until 31 January, unless MPs approve a new deal, or vote in favour of a no-deal exit, by 19 October.

 

 

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