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Schools demand funds from  parents, suggests research

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Pakistani girls attend a class at a government school in eastern Pakistan's Lahore, on Oct. 11, 2014. Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani teenage education rights activist, became the youngest Nobel Prize winner ever as she and Kailash Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize on Oct. 10, 2014, for working to protect children from slavery, extremism and child labor at great risk to their own lives

 

At least 100 English schools, including ‘faith’ schools, could be breaking the law demanding financial contributions from parents, suggests a new investigation…reports Asian Lite News

Pakistani girls attend a class at a government school in eastern Pakistan's Lahore, on Oct. 11, 2014. Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani teenage education rights activist, became the youngest Nobel Prize winner ever as she and Kailash Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize on Oct. 10, 2014, for working to protect children from slavery, extremism and child labor at great risk to their own lives

Schools in England are demanding financial contributions, which might be potentially in breach of the law, new research has suggested.

At least 100 schools in England, many of which were Faith schools  are asking parents for money and are not making it clear that the contributions are voluntary, reports The Daily Telegraph.

Schools are entitled to ask for voluntary contributions from parents but they have to make it clear that they are under no obligation to do so.

The findings, by the British Humanist Association (BHA), followed revelations earlier in the year that Grey Coat Hospital School in West minster, the state school where David Cameron sends his daughter, had sent letters requesting money from prospective parents. Telegraph adds.

The investigation also found that in a large number of cases the financial contribution was described as mandatory.

One Church of England primary school states on its website that “As a Church of England School, we have an annual payment of £30 for the school Building Fund/Capitation for parents. This is not a voluntary contribution but it is a payment all Church of England Schools require to maintain the school buildings and classrooms”.

A Catholic primary explains that “As a voluntary aided school, parents of the pupils attending the school are responsible for contributing 10 per cent towards all building works”, before asking for £100 per family.

One Jewish school was even found to be requesting over £1000 a year (per child) from parents, the investigation revealed,  The Telegraph report points out.

Commenting on the findings, Andrew Copson, the BHA’s chief executive, told The Telegraph, “It is scandalous that the 10 per cent of capital costs which religious groups running state schools are obliged to pay is actually being demanded unlawfully from parents and even that money is being demanded at all.

”These findings make a mockery of that argument, and also undermine the Churches’ claim that the primary aim of their involvement in education is to provide for the poor and disadvantaged.’’

Pakistani girls attend a class at a government school in eastern Pakistan's Lahore, on Oct. 11, 2014. Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani teenage education rights activist, became the youngest Nobel Prize winner ever as she and Kailash Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize on Oct. 10, 2014, for working to protect children from slavery, extremism and child labor at great risk to their own lives
Pakistani girls attend a class at a government school in eastern Pakistan’s Lahore, on Oct. 11, 2014. Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani teenage education rights activist, became the youngest Nobel Prize winner ever as she and Kailash Satyarthi of India won the Nobel Peace Prize on Oct. 10, 2014, for working to protect children from slavery, extremism and child labor at great risk to their own lives