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Virendra Sharma promoting science at an event in Parliament

He is brave. He dares fire and he put his hand below a hammer. The mission is to promote science among his young constituents. Veteran British Asian parliamentarian Virendra Sharma, MP from Ealing Southall, joins lab experiments at parliament to promote science among young children ….reports Asian Lite News 

Virendra Sharma flash cotton
Virendra Sharma MP with burning flash cotton. The cotton is burnt in a quick flash, with no residual products

Ealing Southall MP Virendra Sharma showed a passion for chemistry when taking part in science experiments to mark the 175th anniversary of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

At the parliamentary event held on Wednesday, the popular parliamentarian heard about the importance of good science teaching in primary schools in Ealing Southall and took part in some loud and colourful chemistry experiments performed by children’s presenter Fran Scott and her team from Great Scott! science shows.

Virendra Sharma hammer as part of the experiment
Virendra Sharma hammer as part of the experiment -His hand was protected by non-newtonian goo – a liquid which is also a solid!

Virendra witnessed the whizzes and bangs of chemistry first-hand as Fran and her team created dry ice bubbles, colourful flaming salts and hammered MPs’ hands protected with non-newtonian goo. But behind the colourful chemicals and exciting explosions, the event was an opportunity to discuss the importance of excellent science teaching in primary schools.

Virendra Sharma MP said: “I enjoyed learning more about chemistry and taking part in the experiments. It was also good to speak to the Royal Society of Chemistry about the important work they do in promoting excellent science teaching across the nation’s primary schools.”

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Chief Executive, Robert Parker, said: “Science is an important part of a child’s primary education, and plays a key role in shaping their long term attainment, aspiration and interest in the subject. Unfortunately, in some primary schools, science is not seen as a priority, and too few teachers have a background in the subject. In our 175th anniversary year, we want to see a new emphasis from Government to make primary science inspiring, engaging and relevant”

The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world’s leading chemistry community, advancing excellence in the chemical sciences. With over 50,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the UK’s professional body for chemical scientists; a not-for-profit organisation with 170 years of history and an international vision of the future. We promote, support and celebrate chemistry. We work to shape the future of the chemical sciences – for the benefit of science and humanity.

We are the oldest chemical society in the world and in 2016 we’re celebrating 175 years of progress and people in the chemical sciences. Throughout the year, we’re sharing the stories of how our members past and present have helped to change the world with chemistry.

 

Great Scott! science shows

Great Scott! is the brainchild of children’s TV presenter Fran Scott. She also writes and performs her own science shows as part of Great Scott! with a team of experts, including Dr Indrayani Ghangrekar and Dr Nate Adams who took part in this event.

She has previously presented four science series on CBBC, including Absolute Genius with Dick and Dom, and How to be Epic at Everything. She has also presented a science series for Radio4extra, two series for BBC Learning (in association with the prestigious QE Prize), spear-headed an engineering campaign for CBBC’s Newsround, showcased a stage show at the Edinburgh Fringe, and appeared on Radio4’s Today Programme and Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch. She’s also filmed an Engineering series for BBC Worldwide (Factomania).

Fran has a Masters and First Class Degree in Neuroscience. Annoyed by the constant over-complication of science Fran draws on her knowledge to convert science for the masses, making it not only jargon-free, accessible and accurate, but also bringing entertainment and excitement to the subject.

 

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