Cuba marks 60 years under US sanctions

Advertisement

In January, Cuba has condemned the new US sanctions against eight officials of the island nation,said Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez…reports Asian Lite News

The Republic of Cuba is marking 60 years under a US economic blockade that has deeply affected the communist nation’s fortunes and shows no signs of being lifted, according to reports.

Decreed by US president John F. Kennedy on February 3, 1962, the embargo on all bilateral trade came into effect four days later, the AFP reported.

Its purpose, said Kennedy’s executive order, was to reduce the threat posed by the island nation’s “alignment with the communist powers.”

In January, Cuba has condemned the new US sanctions against eight officials of the island nation, Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez said.

“The US government is persisting in its bad manner to impose its will on other governments via unilateral measures,” Rodriguez wrote on his Twitter page late Thursday.

He added that Cuba would continue to protect its sovereignty.

On Thursday, the US administration of President Joe Biden imposed visa restrictions on eight officials from Cuba who are believed to be linked to the detention, sentencing, and imprisonment of peaceful July 11 protesters.

Meanwhile, Iran’s Vice President for Economic Affairs Mohsen Rezaei had earlier called for closer cooperation with Cuba to counter sanction pressures of the US against the two nations.

“By expanding cooperation, we must neutralise the sanctions and pressure,” Rezaei made the remarks when meeting with Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel on Tuesday in Nicaraguan capital Managua, Xinhua news agency reported citing Iran’s state TV.

Iran respects Cuba’s resistance against the “excessive demands of the oppressors” and is determined to strengthen relations with Cuba, said Rezaei, who is on a visit to Managua to attend the inauguration ceremony of the country’s President Daniel Ortega, according to the report.

ALSO READ: Ukraine standoff: More US troops in Eastern Europe