Thousands of Chinese officials punished for violating frugality rules

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As many as 6,411 were sanctioned for engaging in formalities for formalities’ sake or bureaucratism practices, and 4,940 were punished for hedonism and extravagant conduct…reports Asian Lite News

China’s top anti-graft body punished 11,351 people in April for violating the country’s eight-point code on improving Party and government conduct.

The punished were involved in 7,441 cases, Xinhua news agency reported, citing the monthly statement by the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Commission for Discipline Inspection and the National Supervisory Commission.

Among them, 7,603 received Party disciplinary or administrative penalties, said the statement.

As many as 6,411 were sanctioned for engaging in formalities for formalities’ sake or bureaucratism practices, and 4,940 were punished for hedonism and extravagant conduct, the Chinese media agency reported.

Back in 2012, the CPC released its eight-point rules on frugality to combat undesirable work practices.

Probe into children’s textbook

A nationwide probe into problematic press houses have been launched in China after illustrations in a national publisher’s textbooks sparked controversy for being “ugly”, “racist” and “pornographic,” state media reports said on Sunday.

Netizens on Chinese social media platform like Sina Weibo joined in a campaign to report teaching materials for minors after an inappropriate illustration was spotted in a book meant for kids aged from three to six.

Viral snapshots of kids’ textbooks showed some of the children depicted in strange poses, including a crooked mouth, tongue sticking out and squinting eyes, state media tabloid Global Times (GT) reported.

Some were depicted wearing clothes mimicking the US national flag, the report added.

On Saturday, the Chinese Education Ministry ordered an inspection of school textbooks and urged People’s Education Press to rectify issues flagged.

The order was issued after it was found that textbook illustrations not only differed from common aesthetics but also included sexual connotations, according to GT. The report added that many suspecting that the textbooks did not even undergo proper proofreading and review.

In the response to the criticism, the underfire publisher said they had reflected on public concern and are working to rectify the issues raised.

Zhu Wei, vice director of the Communication Law Research Center at the China University of Political Science and Law, told the GT, the trending topic over the textbook scandal reflected the increasing attention paid to talent cultivation.

According to Zhu, Textbook publishing must undergo strict management with high-level standards to make sure that they are suited to mainstream values and aesthetics. (ANI)

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