US expects no policy shift from Iran under new presidency

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Relations between the U.S. and Iran have further deteriorated following the October 7 attack on U.S. ally Israel by Hamas, which is supported by Iran….reports Asian Lite Newws

Washington did not anticipate any policy changes from Iran following the election of reformist candidate Massoud Pezeshkian, according to the State Department as it played down the likelihood of resuming dialogue.

“We have no expectation that this election will lead to a fundamental change in Iran’s direction or its policies,” said State Department spokesman Matthew Miller, AFP reported.

He noted that supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei is expected to maintain control over Iran’s decisions, as he has since the 1979 Islamic revolution.

Miller mentioned that while steps to reduce Iran’s nuclear program, stop funding terrorism, and end destabilizing activities in the region would be welcome, the U.S. does not anticipate these changes occurring, it was reported.

When asked about the potential for renewed diplomacy with Iran following Pezeshkian’s election, Miller reiterated the U.S. stance that diplomacy is the best way to achieve a sustainable solution regarding Iran’s nuclear program. However, National Security Council spokesman John Kirby firmly stated that the U.S. is not ready to resume nuclear talks with Iran, emphasizing, “No.”

President Joe Biden entered office in 2021 with the goal of rejoining the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran, initially negotiated under former president Barack Obama but later abandoned by Donald Trump, who imposed extensive sanctions on Iran. Negotiations, mediated by the European Union, stalled due to disagreements over the extent of U.S. sanctions relief for Iran.

Relations between the U.S. and Iran have further deteriorated following the October 7 attack on U.S. ally Israel by Hamas, which is supported by Iran.

Meanwhile, Democratic allies will be keeping an eye on the embattled American President’s domestic troubles as they discuss threats posed individually and collectively as a group by Russia, China, and Iran.

The Democratic party has been riven by a bitter debate triggered by his weak performance in the first presidential debate against former President Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee, on June 27.

Some Democrats think he seemed not only incapable of defeating Trump in the election but also governing the country for the next four years, if he wins a second term. They have called for him to make way for someone younger and healthier.

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