GMU offers free seats to Indian students returning from Ukraine

Advertisement

Students will be offered full assistance, free seats and Scholarship as per merit policy and admission requirements of the University, reports Asian Lite News

Offering a major relief to Indian medical students displaced from Ukrainian universities, the Gulf Medical University (GMU) is prepared to accommodate the displaced students with free seats and scholarship based on merit criteria and admission policies of the University.

This effort aims to ensure that the education is not interrupted for students who are affected, the GMU said in a statement.

The GMU said it aims to help students make well-informed decisions regarding their remainder course, assistance in paperwork and smooth transfer.

Thumbay Moideen

“As an Indian it becomes my duty to help our fellow Indians during this difficult situation, we trying to help secure the dreams and future of several displaced students,” said Dr. Thumbay Moideen, Founder President of Thumbay Group & President – Board of Trustees, Gulf Medical University – Ajman, UAE.

Founded in the year 1998, GMU is owned and managed by the multi-business conglomerate Thumbay Group –a widely renowned institution, which offers its students access to state-of-the-art medical education, healthcare, and research in addition to clinical training through various academic health centres, including Thumbay University Hospital, Thumbay Dental Hospital and Thumbay Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Hospitals located in the Campus. The Group also owns and manages 8 Hospitals, 10 Clinics, 48 Pharmacies and 5 Labs under the Healthcare Division.

The initiative aims to offer free seats and scholarship support to displaced students from Ukraine, ensuring an opportunity to pursue education at GMU upon fulfilling the merit criteria and admission policies. Recognising these students as vital contributors to the future of healthcare delivery, GMU would like to focus on ensuring that there is no gap in their education. Students can directly communicate with director of admissions, Sherly Koshy, and mail their documents to helpline@gmu.ac.ae with their credentials.

Over the last 24 years, GMU has scaled new heights by fostering brilliance to over 2600 students plus 2000 part time from more than 90 different nationalities and 29 accredited Undergraduate and Graduate programs run by the 6 constituent colleges in the field medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, biomedical sciences, healthcare management and economics, anesthesia technology, medical laboratory sciences, physiotherapy and healthcare management and economics.

In addition, the university also offers short term certificate courses for health workforce development and career enhancement.

The university’s Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) Programme outcome is aligned to the World Federation of Medical Education (WFME) standards, the Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences Programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS), UK and PharmD Programme is certified by Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), USA.

ALSO READ: Future tense for students returning from Ukraine 

Furthermore, the university-affiliated teaching hospital is JCI accredited, and laboratories are CAP accredited. The national, international, and regional engagements exceed 70 collaborations with leading international universities in Europe, US, Japan, Malaysia and Far East.

For more information on various programs students can visit the university website www.gmu.ac.ae.

Hungary offers to continue studies

Hungarian Universities have offered to foreign students whose studies were disrupted by the Russian military operation in Ukraine to continue their studies in Hungary.

“Hungary is offering foreign students who escaped #UkraineRussianWar (India, Nigeria, other African countries) to continue their studies at Hungarian universities,” tweeted Dr Attila Demko, the head of Hungary’s Centre for Geopolitics.

“All third-country refugees (mostly Africans) were accepted without problems and repatriated if they wished so,” Demko added in his Sunday tweet.