India slams Beijing for building bridge across Pangong Tso Lake

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The MEA Spokesperson said the government has been taking all necessary steps to ensure that “our security interests are fully protected…reports Asian Lite News

India on Thursday took strong exception to China for constructing a bridge across Pangong Tso Lake in eastern Ladakh, stating that it is being constructed in “areas that have been under the illegal occupation of China for around 60 years now.”

“The government has been monitoring this activity very closely. This bridge is being constructed in areas that have been under the illegal occupation of China for around 60 years now. As you are well aware, India has never accepted such illegal occupation,” Ministry of External Affairs Spokesperson Arindam Bagchi said in response to a question during a weekly media briefing.

The MEA Spokesperson said the government has been taking all necessary steps to ensure that “our security interests are fully protected.”

He further said in the last seven years, the government has increased significantly the budget for the development of border infrastructure and completed more roads and bridges than ever before.

These efforts, the MEA Spokesperson said, have provided much needed connectivity to the local population as well as provided logistical support to armed forces.

On Monday, media reports, on the basis of satellite imagery, suggested that the Chinese side is busy constructing a bridge across Pangong Tso Lake in eastern Ladakh.

According to strategic experts, the location is close to the Line of Actual Control (LAC) near the Galwan valley region. The bridge would cater as a link to the North and South banks of the Lake and “China would be able to quickly mobilize and shift the troops, a definite military advantage aimed at enhancing its maneuverability.”

Since 2020, both India and China have deployed more than 50,000 troops in eastern Ladakh – from the Depsang plains to the North to the Demchok area further South.

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