India’s G20 Presidency is a big deal: Global Britain Centre

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India will hold events the length and breadth of the country to showcase the wondrous diversity and modernisation of India…reports Asian Lite News

In assuming the G20 Presidency on December 1, India, the fifth largest economy, has an unprecedented chance to check its clout and credibility in tackling the fragmented global order and India’s G20 Presidency is a big deal, according to Global Britain Centre.

Global Britain Centre was established to drive the conversation around Global Britain – the promise signalled by the historic vote in June 2016 to take back control and renew the country as a free, independent, and sovereign Global Britain tilting to engage fully with her natural allies around the globe. With its Vaccine Maitri global outreach and as the world’s fastest-growing major economy, India has cemented its place on the world stage.

India’s plans until the final G20 Summit in September 2023 are “ambitious, inclusive, action-oriented, and decisive”. India is hosting the largest ever number of participants from 43 heads of delegations and India intends to make a difference globally, said Antonia Filmer in an op-ed article in Global Britain Centre.

The Presidency falls during ‘Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav’, which is an emotionally significant initiative of the Prime Minister Narendra Modi Government to celebrate 75 years of independence, with a powerful programme of sharing 5000 years of the history of India’s people, culture and achievements.

India will hold events the length and breadth of the country to showcase the wondrous diversity and modernisation of India.

No G-20 member has ever welcomed the presidency like India did when she illuminated hundreds of sites, including UNESCO world heritage sites, across the country on December 1.

Numerous other locations were also decorated with the G-20 logo representing ‘Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam’ or, ‘the world is one family.’

With the motto, “One Earth, One family, One future”, India is prepared to bring the world together as she hosts around two hundred G-20-related events, including the marquee summit in September next year, under her year-long presidency.

As G20 President, India intends to develop and strengthen international support for energy and environment, agriculture, trade, digital economy, cyber security, health, employment, tourism, anti-corruption and women’s empowerment, including in focus areas that impact the most vulnerable and disadvantaged, said Filmer.

Presently the G20 accounts for 80 per cent of the gross world product, 75 per cent of international trade, 64 per cent of the global population, and 60 per cent of the world’s land area. Prime Minister Modi believes there is scope for broadening the G20 to include representatives not only from the African Union but South America and countries from the Global South.

This gives clear insight into the New India worldview and his multilateral ambitions for the assembly, this is supported by the close strategic relationships PM Modi has been forging with Brazil and South Africa, said Filmer.

GBC supporter, Professor MD Nalapat’s leader asserts Prime Minister, Narendra Modi is determined that the G20 year will end with setting up new elements of a global monetary architecture that could soon replace the Bretton Woods structure, which was created during a period when the US and Europe dominated trade and commerce.

Nalapat believes the UNSC, the IMF and the IBRD need to be better representatives of the 21st world.

He suggests adding to the G20 similar representative bodies to the EU from Asia, Africa and South America because the Bretton Woods system created tailwinds for the developed countries outside the Soviet bloc and headwinds for the rest.

A favourite focus is the defence of the Indo-Pacific and its Himalayan border, particularly the Indian Ocean, and India’s role in the Quad, Grant Newsham writes “If you can read a map you can understand India’s importance to the Quad–and vice versa….The United States hasn’t got the “bandwidth” of any sort–military, diplomatic, commercial–to hold its own in the Indian Ocean Region….And India’s local knowledge and intelligence coverage–not least of Chinese political warfare efforts throughout the region–are better than anyone else’s, by far. India is at the forefront of dealing with two of the main threats facing the free world for the foreseeable future: The Chinese Communist Party and “extremism.”

Moreover, the Global Britain Centre celebrates the UK-India 2030 Roadmap milestones achieved in 2022; including the agreement on Mutual Recognition of Academic Qualifications- the bespoke Young Professionals Scheme a scheme which provides 18 to 30-year-old Indians to reside and work in the UK for 2 years at ease; and Trade Secretary Kemi Badenoch’s first visit to India last month for the sixth round of Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations.

The GBC strongly believed that Global Britain is well placed to strengthen further our unique and unparalleled partnership with a New India, rooted in shared values, shared languages and shared objectives to strengthen free democracy, free trade and free enterprise – One Earth, One Family, One Future, wrote Filmer. (ANI)

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