‘Inheritance’: Unique gems for new generation

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One of India’s best-known violinists who has been giving solo performances since the age of six, he started learning violin from his father, the well-known Qawwali singer — Shambhu of ‘Shankar-Shambhu Qawwal’ fame…reports Sukant Deepak

Even as violinist Deepak Pandit and Hindustani vocalist Pratibha Singh Baghel recently launched their album ‘Inheritance’ in Mumbai as a tribute to late Lata Mangeshkar, Pandit says that it carries forward more than 100-years-old ‘Thumris’ to a new level.

Baghel lends her voice to selected thumris and one ghazal set on traditional Indian instruments and western ones, including the piano and synthesizer. All songs boast of an accompanying video available on Sufiscore’s YouTube channel.

“Our aim has been to introduce the new generation to some unique gems. I am elated for the opportunity to take forward Indian classical music to youngsters. As long as I am a part of singing or compositions with Budapest Symphony Orchestra, I would like to add a touch of Indian classical music in each upcoming song,” the violinist tells.

One of India’s best-known violinists who has been giving solo performances since the age of six, he started learning violin from his father, the well-known Qawwali singer — Shambhu of ‘Shankar-Shambhu Qawwal’ fame.

Someone surrounded by music from an early age, considering even his grandfather and great-grandfather were musicians, the violinist looks back at his journey.

“Believe it or not, every step has been a complete revelation. Time flew fast but every phase in my career made me evolve and fall in love with music consistently.”

Pandit, who has also learned Western classical music says that its knowledge has given him the opportunity to collaborate with different musicians.

“Knowledge of different systems always helps. Of course, while blending Indian classical and western classical music, it must be ensured that the union is effortless and not jarring.”

Despite multiple offers, he has stayed away from movies owing to the many “restrictions” one faces in the medium.

“I like to follow my instincts and do what gives me happiness. It’s impossible for me to give my best under restrictions. For me, music is my identity, and I would always like to show the real me to the audiences.”

The musician who was associated with the late Jagjit Singh for a long time remembers the ghazal maestro fondly.

“He would always tell me to follow my heart and not make music to please others. Believing that the audiences will like the music only if the musician enjoys making it, he insisted that it was important to impress myself first.”

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