‘Extremely volatile’: Britons advised against travel to Afghanistan

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This comes as many countries in the international community are concerned about the resurgence of terrorism and the threats of terrorist groups emanating from Afghanistan…reports Asian Lite News

United Kingdom’s Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) issued an advisory for British nationals against travelling to Afghanistan as the situation in the country is “extremely volatile”, Khaama Press reported.

The FCDO said that there are no British consular officials present in Afghanistan, and their capacity to offer consular assistance is severely constrained and cannot be provided in person within Afghanistan.

If British nationals still choose to travel or remain in Afghanistan despite the “heightened,” they should maintain a low profile and exercise caution, according to the FCDO.

British citizens may access consular services at the British embassies in neighboring nations, the FCDO stated.

This comes as many countries in the international community are concerned about the resurgence of terrorism and the threats of terrorist groups emanating from Afghanistan, reported Khaama Press.

Photo taken on Nov. 30, 2021 shows the site of a blast in Kabul, capital of Afghanistan. (Photo by Aria/Xinhua/IANS)

Terrorist attacks continue to be a serious threat throughout Afghanistan, including in the area of the airport. Tensions have risen as a result of incidents like the death of Al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri in July 2022.

Recently, in Kabul, the Afghanis witnessed several attacks on educational institutions. In September, there was an attack at the Kaaj Educational Center in Afghanistan’s capital Kabul.

This series of blasts come as the Taliban completed one year of its rule in Afghanistan following the ouster of the US-backed civilian government last year.

Rights groups said the Taliban had broken multiple pledges to respect human and women’s rights. In a recent Human Rights Watch (HRW) report, the Islamic State of Khorasan Province (ISKP) repeatedly attacked Hazaras and other religious minorities at their mosques, schools, and workplaces. While the Taliban have done little to protect these minority communities from suicide bombings and other unlawful attacks from the Islamic State’s (ISIS) affiliate in Afghanistan.

Since the Taliban seized power in August last year, the IS has claimed responsibility for 13 attacks against Hazaras and has been linked to at least 3 more, killing and injuring at least 700 people.

According to HRW, the Hazara are a predominantly Shia Muslim ethnic group that has faced discrimination and abuse by successive Afghan governments for over a century. During the 1990s, Taliban forces targeted the Shia for mass killings and other serious abuses. With the Taliban back in power, the Hazara have been increasingly concerned for their safety and whether the new authorities will protect them. (ANI)

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